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Emergency Planning

Emergencies

Flooded house

Flooding and Severe Weather

It is Tandridge District Council's role to support the emergency services if there is a major incident in the district.

Major incidents can be natural disasters such as flooding and storms or other events such as major traffic accidents, unexploded bombs, pollution incidents, large fires, suspect packages or acts of terrorism. In these circumstances, Tandridge may be called upon by the emergency services to assist in responding to the incident or helping the community recover after the incident.

Supporting Vulnerable People in an Emergency - Privacy Notice

In an emergency such as a fire, flood or snow we work with partner organisations across Surrey to identify people who may become vulnerable during such events. The  following Privacy Notice explains more about how we collate the data.Fair Processing Notice for supporting vulnerable people in an Emergency

Volunteering during an emergency

If you would like to be called upon to help during an incident or emergency please contact your local Volunteer Centre – see details below. They will link you up with the right people so you are ready to help if or when an event happens and an opportunity arises.

It is difficult to involve new volunteers in the midst of an emergency, so please contact these organisations beforehand so that you can be linked up with the relevant groups, and can provide the type of help that would be needed.

Tandridge Voluntary Services Council (Tandridge)

http://www.surreycommunity.info/tvsc/volunteer-centres/

(01883) 722593

How emergency planning works in Surrey

Emergency Planning in Surrey is coordinated by Surrey's Local Resilience Forum (SLRF). In accordance with the Civil Contingencies Act, Tandridge continues to work closely with our partner agencies, through the Local Resilience Forum.

This forum is a multi-agency group committed to making Surrey a safer place by ensuring that all partners can respond effectively when incidents do occur. The purpose of the Local Resilience Forum is to ensure effective delivery of those duties under the Civil Contingencies Act that need to be developed in a multi-agency environment.

The Surrey Local Resilience Forum is made up of key organisations, which include:

  • Surrey Police
  • Surrey Fire and Rescue Service
  • South East Coast Ambulance Service  
  • Surrey County Council
  • District and Borough Councils
  • NHS England
  • Environment Agency

The Surrey Community Risk Register

The Community Risk Register is the first step in the emergency planning process. It had been created to provide public information about the hazards that exist within Surrey. The register outlines hazards and the control measures that are in place to mitigate their impact. Tandridge's plans and preparedness is based on the register. The document can be viewed on Surrey's community risk register page. The register has been published in response to the Civil Contingencies Act 2004.

The hazards have been outlined in generic format as this is the basis of response planning within the District and County, and follows nationally agreed best practice. The generic hazards have been assessed for the likelihood of the event happening and the potential impact that may have within the District which is used to create the risk rating for the hazard. The likelihood and impact values were agreed through the multi-agency Risk Assessment Working Group on behalf of the SLRF.

The inclusion of these hazards and scenarios in the register does not mean that the SLRF believes the risk will materialise or that it would be of that scale. They are based upon worst case scenario assumptions and will be used to assist the District and SLRF in establishing sufficient control measures to mitigate those hazards. This Community Risk Register will be regularly reviewed and updated as required.

Tandridge has reviewed the Risk Register and is happy to adopt the Surrey Community Risk Register as the Risk Register for Tandridge.

Emergency planning in Tandridge

Tandridge is the same as any other council and has been given statutory responsibilities to respond to major incidents. The main roles are:

  • Support the emergency services.
  • Assistance to people in distress.
  • Coordinate the activities of their various departments and other agencies.
  • Release information that has been agreed by the Police to the media and give advice to the public.
  • Keep local council services going in as normal a way as possible.
  • Restore stability with the aim of restoring normality.

Emergency plans

To respond to any incident the Council has created response plans. The first is the Emergency Plan which contains details of the generic arrangements in place for responding to an emergency. The plan contains details of the Control Room along with the various roles and reponsibilities of the officers that may be asked to respond. The plan also contains contact details for all key staff.                               

The second plan is the Emergency Control Centre Plan which contains all the necessary information to set up and run any type of emergency centre that may be requested by the emergency services.

Tandridge has other plans to help it respond to any incident, such as:

  • Flooding
  • Major accidents
  • Fire/explosions/bombing
  • Civil Riot
  • Foot & Mouth
  • Chemical or nuclear attack
  • Environmental sabotage
  • Terrorism

In response to these events, the Council could be asked to provide a variety of services as well as general advice to the public.

What can the Council do in an emergency?

The Council can provide assistance in a number of ways depending on the nature of the incident.

The Council can provide:

  • A Rest Centre to provide temporary accommodation for people evacuated from a specific area. These are normally set up with assistance from partnering agencies such as Surrey County Council’s Social Care, Surrey Police and  voluntary agencies to give support to those affected by the incident.
  • If an incident requires people to be evacuated from their home for a prolonged period, the Council can assist in finding temporary alternative accommodation.
  • A Survivor Reception Centre, which is a secure area where uninjured survivors involved in a major incident, can be taken for shelter. These are set up by the Council in conjunction with Police, who will lead.
  • There may also be a case for setting up a Family and Friends Reception Centre for use by friends and relatives arriving at a scene of a major incident. Such a centre would also be set up in conjunction with the Police.
  • Humanitarian Assistance Centres can be set up after a major incident as an additional resource specifically for helping affected residents and businesses with advice on anything from insurance through to grief or trauma counselling.
  • Additional staff can be required for the use of plant equipment, e.g. in the event of a flooding incident.
  • Advice, guidance, monitoring with regard to any environmental aspects of the incident.
  • Advice on dangerous structures.
  • Rehabilitating communities following an incident.

What should I do in an emergency?

The first thing to do if you discover or experience an emergency is dial 999. Do not assume someone else has done it. You may be advised to stay inside, close all windows and doors and to look and listen out for advice and information. You can do this by:

  • Using local radio stations
  • Using national radio stations and television news programmes
  • Monitoring social media, such as the Council’s Twitter account and Streetlife
  • Listening out for and make a note of emergency phone numbers
  • Passing on warnings to those that may have missed them and check on the elderly and vulnerable.

Try not to use your home or mobile telephone to find out what's going on. Remember those responding to the incident will need to use the networks to coordinate the response. Too many calls may overload the system, which may mean that neither you, or the emergency services will be able to use it.

You may be asked to evacuate to a place of safety. If so, you may be asked to go to a nearby Assembly Point from where you would be transported to a Local Authority Rest Centre.

If you are affected by an emergency and you decide to stay with relatives or friends, it is recommended you tell your neighbour, the Police or a Local Authority Officer where you have gone, who is with you and how you can be contacted. This could save someone hunting for you if they think that you’re missing.

Emergency situations are rare, but if they do happen, there are a few simple steps that can be taken to minimise the effects:

  • Create your own community or individual family emergency plan. This could be a simple list of friends, family, and key contacts such as your GP with all their contact details. It might include information about where to meet if you cannot be at home, the names and locations of people who could look after you or your pets in an emergency. A list of all specific medical conditions and medication you or your house companions may need.
  • Listen to the instructions given to you by the emergency services or on the TV, radio or on social media
  • Make sure your home is adequately insured and everything is covered.
  • Make sure your property is in good order.
  • Check you know how to turn off your utilities e.g. gas, electricity and water supplies.
  • It may also be useful to keep some items in a safe place that could be helpful in an emergency situation including a torch (and spare batteries), candles, cooking equipment (including a tin opener, utensils and cutlery), drinks (cans of juice bottled water), long life food (e.g. tinned food), portable radio and spare batteries, blankets, dry clothing and medication (including baby items).

The first thing to do if you discover or experience an emergency is dial 999. Do not assume someone else has done it. You may be advised to stay inside, close all windows and doors and to look and listen out for advice and information. You can do this by:

·         Using local radio stations

·         Using national radio stations and television news programmes

·         Monitoring social media, such as the Council’s Twitter account and Streetlife

·         Listening out for and make a note of emergency phone numbers

·         Passing on warnings to those that may have missed them and check on the elderly and vulnerable.

Try not to use your home or mobile telephone to find out what's going on. Remember those responding to the incident will need to use the networks to coordinate the response. Too many calls may overload the system, which may mean that neither you, or the emergency services will be able to use it.

You may be asked to evacuate to a place of safety. If so, you may be asked to go to a nearby Assembly Point from where you would be transported to a Local Authority Rest Centre. 

If you are affected by an emergency and you decide to stay with relatives or friends, it is recommended you tell your neighbour, the Police or a Local Authority Officer where you have gone, who is with you and how you can be contacted. This could save someone hunting for you if they think that you’re missing

How should I prepare for an emergency?

Emergency situations are rare, but if they do happen, there are a few simple steps that can be taken to minimise the effects:

  • Create your own community or individual family emergency plan. This could be a simple list of friends, family, and key contacts such as your GP with all their contact details. It might include information about where to meet if you cannot be at home, the names and locations of people who could look after you or your pets in an emergency. A list of all specific medical conditions and medication you or your house companions may need.
  • Listen to the instructions given to you by the emergency services or on the TV, radio or on social media
  • Make sure your home is adequately insured and everything is covered.
  • Make sure your property is in good order.
  • Check you know how to turn off your utilities e.g. gas, electricity and water supplies.
  • It may also be useful to keep some items in a safe place that could be helpful in an emergency situation including a torch (and spare batteries), candles, cooking equipment (including a tin opener, utensils and cutlery), drinks (cans of juice bottled water), long life food (e.g. tinned food), portable radio and spare batteries, blankets, dry clothing and medication (including baby items).

Is there any more information about emergencies?

Below are a list of websites that are a useful source of information:

 Surrey County Councils website https://www.surreycc.gov.uk/people-and-community/emergency-planning-and-community-safety contains information on community resilience including:

  • Guidance of how to prepare for a variety of emergencies that could occur
  • A template to help create a community emergency plan
  • A template to create a household community plan
  • More details on the risks in Surrey.

In addition there is also: